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Evaluation reports are either openly accessible via pdf download, or accessible via MSF's internal Sharepoint, which is mainly due to the sensitive nature of the operational contexts and resulting content. However, there are ongoing discussions about making all evaluation reports publicly searchable. If you are an MSF association member, reports are made available on various associate platforms such as www.insideOCB.com.

Topic

Country/Region

This report sets out the results of the evaluation of two emergency interventions: outbreak of malaria and measles epidemic, carried out by OCG in Orientale Province of the Democratic Republic of the Congo between June 2012 and July 2013. It is a retrospective evaluation that was done between March and May 2014, with the methodology based mainly on a review of documents and interviews with resource persons. Its objective was to capitalise on the lessons learned so as to improve preparation and response capacity for future epidemics in similar situations.

Alena Koscalova and Marta Iscla
01/05/2014

This evaluation looks at the OCBA response in the Upper Nile crisis in 2014. OCBA, with emergency response as its core action, attempts to examine the response in real time. It’s the first time OCBA uses the real time evaluation as a tool for improving their emergency programs. The report describes the way OCBA responded to the needs of the displaced in a volatile context. The analysis focuses on the relevance, appropriateness and effectiveness of the program and coordination between the regular and emergency missions, other MSF sections and various external actors.

DKALOGEROPOULOU
08/01/2015

The report describes the OCBA response in Gao, Ansongo and Bourem districts in Mali in 2013. The evaluation took place a few months after the emergency situation had calmed down in order to document the situation and capitalize on lessons learned for future emergencies in similar settings. The report also includes a summary of the strengths and weaknesses of the response and a number of recommendations to be utilized for preparing and conducting emergency response programming.

DKalogeropoulou
08/01/2015

Following the earthquake in 2010 and the emergency response that ensued, MSF-OCG took the decision to invest in a hospital in the Leogane area that was for several years the biggest hospital managed by MSF-OCG. Given that for the last three years this was the only MSF-OCG project in the country, that the capital is located only two hours from the hospital and that there is a strategic ambition within MSF-OCG to review mission set-ups, OCG and the field teams determined that 2013 was an opportune time to review the Haiti mission.

Annie Desilets
01/11/2014

This survey investigates patients’ coping mechanisms and their dependence on medical institutions both from the patients’ standpoint and from that of MSF’s project teams.

Marc Le Pape and Suzanne Bradol
08/07/2015

Humanitarian medicine is intended for marginalized people, hit by a crisis or deprived of access to medical care. It is made up of a wide range of practices with few obvious connections between them. Some of them rely on specific know-how, built up through borrowing and innovation primarily over the last three decades, whilst others reflect a different way of using the knowledge we already have. This study helps us understand how the specificity of humanitarian medicine stems from real-life situations, more than from the medical act in itself. 

Rony Brauman
08/07/2015

A series of failures was the starting point for this analysis. Several outbreaks of hepatitis E, transmitted via the water supply, occurred in refugee and IDP sites in the Sahel (Sudan in 2004, and Chad in 2007) and in central Africa (Central African Republic in 2002, and Uganda in 2007). MSF was responsible for all or part of the water supply, as well as medical care. These outbreaks are a reminder that significant infectious risks persists even after we implement our usual procedures.

Jean-Hervé Bradol, Francisco Diaz, Jérôme Léglise, Marc Le Pape
08/07/2015

Four years after the 2005 Niger crisis, many things have changed in the nutrition field. This cahier aims at considering this evolution and exploring new possibilities for action for MSF: how can these changes  get MSF to reconsider its own goals and move its areas of intervention? How can new knowledge and the experience gained by our teams since the crisis in Niger lead to new operational ambitions?
 

Jean-Hervé Bradol, Jean-Hervé Jézéquel
01/06/2010

This study sheds light on the mechanisms producing the official data used by humanitarian aid decision makers. It views Early Warning Systems (EWS) as tools that facilitate consensus between the decision-makers involved in the allocation of food aid, enabling them to reach institutional agreements. This argument is strengthened by a socio-theoretical analysis and by ethnographic observation of experts' practice in Ethiopia (2002-2004), whose results of food aid evaluations appear as a combination of empirical and political factors.
 

François Enten
01/11/2008

To address protection, however, is to address the question of our responsibility and role when confronted with violence, in the context of healthcare. Has this question been settled once and for all within MSF? In order to provide elements for a reply, the study looks at the practices and discourse, both past and present, employed by MSF (headquarters, field teams, individuals) when faced with situations of violence affecting either the population in general, or the people we assist.

Judith Soussan
08/07/2015

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