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Evaluation reports are either openly accessible via pdf download, or accessible via MSF's internal Sharepoint, which is mainly due to the sensitive nature of the operational contexts and resulting content. However, there are ongoing discussions about making all evaluation reports publicly searchable. If you are an MSF association member, reports are made available on various associate platforms such as www.insideOCB.com.

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This report sets out the results of the evaluation of two emergency interventions: outbreak of malaria and measles epidemic, carried out by OCG in Orientale Province of the Democratic Republic of the Congo between June 2012 and July 2013. It is a retrospective evaluation that was done between March and May 2014, with the methodology based mainly on a review of documents and interviews with resource persons. Its objective was to capitalise on the lessons learned so as to improve preparation and response capacity for future epidemics in similar situations.

Alena Koscalova and Marta Iscla
01/05/2014

In September 2004, the Board of MSF-France decided to undertake a critique of the section’s operations in Darfur in 2003 and 2004. According to the terms of reference, the aim was less to ‘evaluate’ our intervention than to subject it to a critical examination which would enable us to “identify our weaknesses and the ways in which they can be corrected”. It addresses the following issues:

Dr. Corinne Danet, Sophie Delaunay, Dr. Evelyne Depoortere, Fabrice Weissman
01/01/2007

Through an analysis of the events that have marked MSF’s history since 2003, this series of case studies and historical accounts describes the evolution of MSF's humanitarian ambitions, the resistance to these ambitions and the political arrangements that overcame this resistance (or that failed to do so).

edited by Claire Magone, Michaël Neuman, Fabrice Weissman
22/11/2011

Between late 2010 and the end of 2014 and under extremely difficult conditions, Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) carried out a project to combat Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also known as sleeping sickness, in the Dingila, Ango and Zobia regions of Orientale Province in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). HAT in DRC is caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and is transmitted by the tsetse fly (Glossina genus) of the Palpalis group. Without effective treatment, virtually all first-stage HAT patients and one hundred per cent of second-stage patients will die.

by Simon Van Nieuwenhove
16/09/2015
Entre fin 2010 et fin 2014, Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) a, dans des conditions extrêmement difficiles, mené un projet de lutte contre la trypanosomiase humaine africaine (THA) ou maladie du sommeil dans la région de Dingila, Ango et Zobia, dans la Province Orientale de la République Démocratique du Congo (RDC). La THA en RDC est causée par Trypanosoma brucei gambiense et y est transmise par des glossines (mouches tsé-tsé) du groupe palpalis. Sans traitement efficace, quasi tous les malades au premier stade et cent pourcent de malades au deuxième stade de la THA meurent.
by Simon Van Nieuwenhove
21/09/2015

Entre fin 2010 et fin 2014, Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) a, dans des conditions extrêmement difficiles, mené un projet de lutte contre la trypanosomiase humaine africaine (THA) ou maladie du sommeil dans la région de Dingila, Ango et Zobia, dans la Province Orientale de la République Démocratique du Congo (RDC). La THA en RDC est causée par Trypanosoma brucei gambiense et y est transmise par des glossines (mouches tsé-tsé) du groupe palpalis. Sans traitement efficace, quasi tous les malades au premier stade et cent pourcent de malades au deuxième stade de la THA meurent.

Simon Van Nieuwenhove
01/10/2015

Between late 2010 and the end of 2014 and under extremely difficult conditions, Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) carried out a project to combat Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also known as sleeping sickness, in the Dingila, Ango and Zobia regions of Orientale Province in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). HAT in DRC is caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and is transmitted by the tsetse fly (Glossina genus) of the Palpalis group. Without effective treatment, virtually all first-stage HAT patients and one hundred per cent of second-stage patients will die.

Simon Van Nieuwenhove
19/10/2015

MSF OCB commissioned an extensive multi-sectoral critical review of its Ebola intervention. The summary report highlights key findings from all specific reports and draws global conclusions. Lessons have been identified both, for future large scale emergency responses as well as for a next Ebola response. Many of lessons identified are not entirely new, but their importance has been strongly accentuated by the extremity of this health crisis. Priority recommendations are listed in the summary report, while specific recommendations are made in the respective reports.

The following persons have contributed to this report: Virginie Adams, Dr Marie-Pierre Allié, Pierre Beurrier, Murray Biedler, Elio de Bonis, Prof. Robert Colebunder, David Curtis, Gillian Dacey, Veronique de Clerck, Dr Javier Gabaldon, Xavier Henry, Francois Mounis and Veronica Sanchez.
26/04/2016

During the 2014-2015 Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa, MSF built a number of Ebola Treatment Centres (ETCs). MSF set up centres in the three countries at different moments and with different MSF Operational Sections, which resulted in a heterogenic collection of solutions. This review was conducted jointly for all MSF operational centers (OCs). It was commissioned by OCA and was conducted as part of the OCB Ebola review. 

This publication was produced at the request of MSF OCA coordinated within a broader review on OCB's response to the Ebola emergency, under the management of the Stockholm Evaluation Unit. It was prepared independently by Veronica Sanchez Carrera.
01/12/2015

Despite a 5 day SIAs by MOH in 2014, a new outbreak began in Katanga/DRC and spread throughout 2015. A comprehensive, integrated “3 headed” response was chosen by MSF-OCG in 3 Health Zones (HZ) of Tanganyika, including preventive and curative activities (for measles, malaria, and malnutrition): although quite ambitious given available HR resources, this was relevant given these “three” on-going emergencies in Tanganyika.

This publication was produced at the request of MSF OCG, under the management of MSF Paris. It was prepared independently by Cameron Bopp, Marie-Laure Le Coconnier, and Vincent Brown.
27/06/2016

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