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Some evaluation reports are public and can be downloaded from this website, while others are restricted to MSF users and can only be accessed via Tukul. This limitation is mainly due to the sensitive nature of the operational contexts and the resulting content. However, there are internal discussions about making all evaluation reports publicly searchable. If you are an MSF association member, reports are made available on various associate platforms such as www.insideOCB.com.

Between late 2010 and the end of 2014 and under extremely difficult conditions, Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) carried out a project to combat Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also known as sleeping sickness, in the Dingila, Ango and Zobia regions of Orientale Province in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). HAT in DRC is caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and is transmitted by the tsetse fly (Glossina genus) of the Palpalis group. Without effective treatment, virtually all first-stage HAT patients and one hundred per cent of second-stage patients will die.

Simon Van Nieuwenhove
19/10/2015

Entre fin 2010 et fin 2014, Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) a, dans des conditions extrêmement difficiles, mené un projet de lutte contre la trypanosomiase humaine africaine (THA) ou maladie du sommeil dans la région de Dingila, Ango et Zobia, dans la Province Orientale de la République Démocratique du Congo (RDC). La THA en RDC est causée par Trypanosoma brucei gambiense et y est transmise par des glossines (mouches tsé-tsé) du groupe palpalis. Sans traitement efficace, quasi tous les malades au premier stade et cent pourcent de malades au deuxième stade de la THA meurent.

Simon Van Nieuwenhove
01/10/2015

Between late 2010 and the end of 2014 and under extremely difficult conditions, Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) carried out a project to combat Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also known as sleeping sickness, in the Dingila, Ango and Zobia regions of Orientale Province in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). HAT in DRC is caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and is transmitted by the tsetse fly (Glossina genus) of the Palpalis group. Without effective treatment, virtually all first-stage HAT patients and one hundred per cent of second-stage patients will die.

Simon Van Nieuwenhove
30/09/2015

Entre fin 2010 et fin 2014, Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) a, dans des conditions extrêmement difficiles, mené un projet de lutte contre la trypanosomiase humaine africaine (THA) ou maladie du sommeil dans la région de Dingila, Ango et Zobia, dans la Province Orientale de la République Démocratique du Congo (RDC). La THA en RDC est causée par Trypanosoma brucei gambiense et y est transmise par des glossines (mouches tsé-tsé) du groupe palpalis. Sans traitement efficace, quasi tous les malades au premier stade et cent pourcent de malades au deuxième stade de la THA meurent.

Simon Van Nieuwenhove
30/09/2015
Entre fin 2010 et fin 2014, Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) a, dans des conditions extrêmement difficiles, mené un projet de lutte contre la trypanosomiase humaine africaine (THA) ou maladie du sommeil dans la région de Dingila, Ango et Zobia, dans la Province Orientale de la République Démocratique du Congo (RDC). La THA en RDC est causée par Trypanosoma brucei gambiense et y est transmise par des glossines (mouches tsé-tsé) du groupe palpalis. Sans traitement efficace, quasi tous les malades au premier stade et cent pourcent de malades au deuxième stade de la THA meurent.
by Simon Van Nieuwenhove
21/09/2015

Between late 2010 and the end of 2014 and under extremely difficult conditions, Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) carried out a project to combat Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also known as sleeping sickness, in the Dingila, Ango and Zobia regions of Orientale Province in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). HAT in DRC is caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and is transmitted by the tsetse fly (Glossina genus) of the Palpalis group. Without effective treatment, virtually all first-stage HAT patients and one hundred per cent of second-stage patients will die.

by Simon Van Nieuwenhove
16/09/2015

A series of failures was the starting point for this analysis. Several outbreaks of hepatitis E, transmitted via the water supply, occurred in refugee and IDP sites in the Sahel (Sudan in 2004, and Chad in 2007) and in central Africa (Central African Republic in 2002, and Uganda in 2007). MSF was responsible for all or part of the water supply, as well as medical care. These outbreaks are a reminder that significant infectious risks persists even after we implement our usual procedures.

Jean-Hervé Bradol, Francisco Diaz, Jérôme Léglise, Marc Le Pape
08/07/2015

This is a comprehensive evaluation of OCA's in country emergency response units in Nigeria, Chad, North Kivu, South Kivu and Katanga. The report consists of the transversal analysis of all of the ERUs as well as the individual evaluations of each specific ERU project. The outcomes have been reduced into Management Summary Charts found on p.8 of the report.

by Juan Luis Dominguez and Timothy McCann, supported by the Stockholm Evaluation Unit
26/03/2015

This is a comprehensive evaluation of OCA's in country emergency response units in Nigeria, Chad, North Kivu, South Kivu and Katanga. The report consists of the transversal analysis of all of the ERUs as well as the individual evaluations of each specific ERU project. The outcomes have been reduced into Management Summary Charts found on p.8 of the report.

by Juan Luis Dominguez and Timothy McCann, Stockholm Evaluation Unit
26/03/2015

This evaluation is of the MSF Belgium Sexual and Gender Based Violence (SGBV) project in Mbare, Harare, Zimbabwe (2011-2014). It is not a comprehensive evaluation of the whole project, but an evaluation of selected strategies/components. The selected strategies/components for analysis are: ‘nurse-based care’, ‘decentralization’, the ‘72 hour strategy’, the work to ‘raise the profile of rape and the need for medical care’ and the ‘social work’.

by Anne-Sofie Munk
02/03/2015

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