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Some evaluation reports are public and can be downloaded from this website, while others are restricted to MSF users and can only be accessed via Tukul. This limitation is mainly due to the sensitive nature of the operational contexts and the resulting content. However, there are internal discussions about making all evaluation reports publicly searchable. If you are an MSF association member, reports are made available on various associate platforms such as www.insideOCB.com.

Country/Region

After seven years of existence and shortly before its closure, Cell 2 and the Direction of Operations launched a lessons-learned exercise of the Cardiovascular Emergency Project set at Hospital No. 9 in Grozny, Chechnya. The objective of this review was to relate the main steps and lessons of this so-called "atypical" medical project, at least in the light of MSF's experience, mobilizing a high-tech clinical expertise such as thrombolysis and angiography.

***English and French version available***

This publication was produced by MSF OCP, Cell2, in cooperation with RIDER.
01/03/2019

The objective of this lessons learnt exercise was to assess the advantages and disadvantages of the UNITAID grant governance and management model for project achievements in terms of medical (and related) outcomes, strategic decisions, the potential for collaboration between multiple MSF entities and to leverage the learnings for replication in future projects. The exercise showed that the project directly delivered a new, more effective, simpler and much cheaper treatment to patients across seven countries.

This publication was produced at the request of MSF OCG, under the management of the Vienna Evaluation Unit. It was prepared independently by Hugues Juillerat, Sharon McClenaghan and Glenn O’Neil of TRAASS International.
15/01/2019

This document describes the project Lessons identified at the end of the market entry planning phase for MSF in Finland. It summarises the successes and challenges encountered during the project, lists the learning themes arising from these successes and challenges, and includes a set of lessons derived from an analysis of these learning points. The Annex contains a proposed (brief) framework with criteria and pre-requisites for a successful Market Entry Plan in MSF based on this experience. NOTE: This is not an evaluation and therefore there is no ambition for independent judgement.

This Retrospect was facilitated by the Stockholm Evaluation Unit on behalf of the Project Team. The report has been prepared by Timothy McCann.
30/10/2017

This report is a review of advocacy within the MSF movement from 2010-2015. Commissioned by the core ExCom, the aim of this review was to explore the effectiveness of MSF advocacy and produce recommendations to improve its approach, coordination and organization in support to operations within the movement. Two external evaluation consultants, Glenn O’Neil and Liesbeth Schockaert, conducted the review with the support of Nirupama Sarma who carried out a complementary review of the Access Campaign (AC).

This publication was produced at the request of MSF International, under the management of the Vienna Evaluation Unit. It was prepared independently by Glenn O'Neil and Liesbeth Schockaert, with contributions from Nirupama Sarma.
14/09/2016

In recent years, MSF has noted that ‘social violence’ is strongly linked to health exclusion and dysfunctional health systems. Therefore, the Operational Centre Geneva (OCG) initiated an intervention in Honduras in 2010 and a project in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico in January 2014. The current evaluation aims to determine the pertinence, appropriateness, effectiveness and impact of the OCG projects in Honduras and Mexico in responding to identified needs.

This publication was produced at the request of MSF OCG, under the management of the Vienna Evaluation Unit. It was prepared independently by Silvia Gurrola Bonilla, MSc. and Regina Escudero Durán, MD.
23/02/2016

In recent years, MSF has noted that ‘social violence’ is strongly linked to health exclusion and dysfunctional health systems. Therefore, the Operational Centre Geneva (OCG) initiated an intervention in Honduras in 2010 and a project in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico in January 2014. The current evaluation aims to determine the pertinence, appropriateness, effectiveness and impact of the OCG projects in Honduras and Mexico in responding to identified needs.

This publication was produced at the request of MSF OCG, under the management of the Vienna Evaluation Unit. It was prepared independently by Silvia Gurrola Bonilla, MSc. and Regina Escudero Durán, MD.
23/02/2016

MSF has received UNITAID grants since 2013. For several financial, operational and opportunistic reasons, the opportunity and adequacy of receiving funds from UNITAID was questioned by the MSF medical and operational directors. In October 2014 the MedOp platform took a decision not to seek any further UNITAID funding for a one-year period-ending in October 2015.

This evaluation was conducted by Nicole Henze on behalf of the Stockholm Evaluation Unit of MSF. Finalised in November 2015. This publication was produced at the request of MSF MedOp, under the management of the Stockholm Evaluation Unit. It was prepared independently by Nicole Henze.
30/12/2015

An external evaluation of the support programs has been conducted between April and June 2015. This 360° snapshot was aiming at evaluating the appropriateness, the effectiveness and the impact of the support activities operated from Turkey and Lebanon.

Stockholm Evaluation Unit. Ofelia Garcia (lead evaluator)
30/07/2015

MSF OCBA , Review of Partnership 2011-2013 Helsinki Citizen Assembly - MSF OCBA Istanbul - Kilis Migrants Syria Refugees Gaias Consulting C. Boulanger Soma

FDESTENABES
28/08/2014

The example of Shishelweni demonstrates that in the context of high prevalence of HIV/TB infections and limited resources available decentralisation of HIV and TB care from regional and district hospitals to primary health care clinics and community level is the way to improve access, coverage, effectiveness and efficiency of service delivery. It also improves satisfaction and acceptance of health service providers, direct beneficiaries and the wider community.

Mzia Turashvili
01/12/2013

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