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Some evaluation reports are public and can be downloaded from this website, while others are restricted to MSF users and can only be accessed via Tukul. This limitation is mainly due to the sensitive nature of the operational contexts and the resulting content. However, there are internal discussions about making all evaluation reports publicly searchable. If you are an MSF association member, reports are made available on various associate platforms such as www.insideOCB.com.

Country/Region

This report describes the OCB Khayelitsha Project, initiated in 2000, as one of the first MSF projects in Africa to introduce antiretroviral treatment (ART) into the public sector. Currently implementing HIV and tuberculosis (TB) programs, it has produced dozens of very well-received publications in peer-reviewed scientific journals, in large part because of its innovative strategies, major investment in a locally driven monitoring and evaluation system, and a long-standing collaboration with the University of Cape Town (UCT), civil society and local health authorities.

Stockholm Evaluation Unit
10/04/2014

This evaluation aimed at gaining perspective on and learning from current partnership practices, informing the debate on MSF’s policy on partnerships and providing guidance for future engagement. Four separate field evaluations in DRC, Kenya, Niger and North Korea as well as a desk review of seven additional partnerships have been conducted. The report provides good practice examples and practical recommendations.

Karima Hammadi and Annie Désilets
01/02/2012

Through an analysis of the events that have marked MSF’s history since 2003, this series of case studies and historical accounts describes the evolution of MSF's humanitarian ambitions, the resistance to these ambitions and the political arrangements that overcame this resistance (or that failed to do so).

edited by Claire Magone, Michaël Neuman, Fabrice Weissman
22/11/2011

Since civil unrest and violence erupted in countries across Northern Africa and the Middle East (referred as NAME in the document) teams from the five MSF OCs (Operational Centres) have been assisting the populations. OCB has mainly been active in Egypt, Bahrain, Libya and Italy (Lampedusa with the influx of migrants from the Northern African regions). Activities and challenges have varied from one context to another. The overall aim of the mapping/compilation is to describe all of OCB’s activities from January to August 2011, in relation to the unrests.

David Crémoux
01/09/2011

In February 2011, four MSF staff members acquired Lassa Fever in the MSF-run hospital, GRC (2 of whom died). This led OCB to propose an evaluation of the related events occurring in January-March, in order to learn lessons and possibly adjust internal procedures or processes. A qualitative evaluation was carried out through interviews and document-review.

Mzia Turashvil
09/08/2011

Reviewed Interventions This chapter provides an overview of the contexts and MSF interventions of all the reviewed interventions (DRC, Cameroun, Djibouti, Iraq, South Africa and Pakistan).

Alena Koscalova, Elena Lucchi
16/12/2010

The Gondama Referral Centre (GRC) project is a reference hospital set up by Médecins Sans Frontières – Operational Centre Brussels (MSF-OCB) to provide secondary level healthcare to children under 15 and pregnant and lactating women in Gondama, Bo district in Sierra Leone. The Ministry of Health (MoH) having recently launched a free healthcare policy for the same target group1 provides a window of opportunity for MSF to gradually hand over its activities.

Guillaume Jouquet and Alexis Eggermont
01/07/2010

The purpose of this evaluation was to review the experience in needs assessment and response to displacement in open settings. For the evaluation process, six interventions were reviewed: MSF Operational Centre Geneva (OCG) interventions in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) (Haut-Uélé), Djibouti, Cameroon and Iraq; Operational Centre Brussels (OCB) interventions in South Africa and Pakistan; and partial review of Operational Centre Paris (OCP) experience in Pakistan.

Alena Koscalova and Elena Lucchi
01/06/2010

The formation of HAACO was initiated by Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) who had been operating a HIV/AIDS project since 1999 in Khayalitsha in the Western Cape and since 2003 in rural Lusikisiki in the Eastern Cape province. Most of the services provided by the MSF project were handed over to the DoH. However the adherence element was not. The DoH had neither the financial nor the structural capacity to take on the Adherence programme. Hence the formation of HAACO. This process was intended to review the strategic options for the future of HAACO.

Sunjay Panday and Loretta van Schalkwyk
20/02/2008

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