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Some evaluation reports are public and can be downloaded from this website, while others are restricted to MSF users and can only be accessed via Tukul. This limitation is mainly due to the sensitive nature of the operational contexts and the resulting content. However, there are internal discussions about making all evaluation reports publicly searchable. If you are an MSF association member, reports are made available on various associate platforms such as www.insideOCB.com.

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In June 2009, after three years of the project by MSF-CH (2005 to 2008) in Dabola, Guinea, a final evaluation was conducted with the objective to (i) document the project’s strategies and (ii) undertake a critical analysisof the project regarding access to health care, perception, sustainability and impact.

Dr. Sophie Odermatt-Biays
03/09/2009

Médecins Sans Frontières has been running HIV/AIDS treatment programmes since 2001. As national systems scaled up capacity, MSF began to hand over HIV projects in 2005. Variable experience with handover and internal debates about MSF responsibility to patients led OCG to propose an evaluation of the handover process, to learn from experience and inform policy and practice. A qualitative review was carried out through interviews, case studies in Cameroon and Laos, and review of other vertical and integrated HIV projects.

Dr. Rosamund Lewis and Dr. PehrOlov Pehrson
01/01/2009

This study sheds light on the mechanisms producing the official data used by humanitarian aid decision makers. It views Early Warning Systems (EWS) as tools that facilitate consensus between the decision-makers involved in the allocation of food aid, enabling them to reach institutional agreements. This argument is strengthened by a socio-theoretical analysis and by ethnographic observation of experts' practice in Ethiopia (2002-2004), whose results of food aid evaluations appear as a combination of empirical and political factors.
 

François Enten
01/11/2008

The primary purpose of this evaluation was to help the field and HQ staff of MSF make informed decisions on the future of the Benson Hospital project, particularly the focus of future activities and a potential time frame for the handover of the services currently provided by MSF to other actors in Liberia.

Sophie Delaunay and Sally Girvin
01/08/2008

The purpose of this document is to provide an overview of the handover of the HIV program to the Bureau of Health (BoH) in the Kahsay Abera Hospital (KAH), Humera, Ethiopia, in 2007. The lessons learnt during the handover process could be of value to other MSF teams faced with an impeding handover of activities to the local health structure. A document in this vein was written directly following the handover in July 2007 however this current text acts as an updated version using the knowledge gained during the ten months following handover.

17/03/2008

The formation of HAACO was initiated by Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) who had been operating a HIV/AIDS project since 1999 in Khayalitsha in the Western Cape and since 2003 in rural Lusikisiki in the Eastern Cape province. Most of the services provided by the MSF project were handed over to the DoH. However the adherence element was not. The DoH had neither the financial nor the structural capacity to take on the Adherence programme. Hence the formation of HAACO. This process was intended to review the strategic options for the future of HAACO.

Sunjay Panday and Loretta van Schalkwyk
20/02/2008

MSF closed all operations in Lusikisiki at the end of October 2006. That date marked the end of four years of operations setting up a model of comprehensive and decentralized HIV care in one of the poorest and most underserved rural areas in South Africa with a high prevalence of infection. The model implemented has been widely used in South Africa to influence relevant policies. This report looks at the chain of events following the handover and changes in the model of care.

01/05/2007

The political context toward HIV and AIDS in South Africa is particularly difficult with a government denying the seriousness of the epidemic, with a minister of health undermining confidence in HIV program, not supporting policy changes nor fully budgeting for HIV program, promoting beetroots, lemon and olive oil to treat AIDS. This paper examines the organisation of the project and the handover

Guillaume Jouquet
23/11/2006

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